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Heating A Yurt

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Old 07-31-2019, 11:27 AM   #11
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

You can try diesel

heating

, used by the military for over 20 years. No

moisture

build up and vented like a wood stove. You can still find good used ones on ebay. Note, they're not CSA approved but good units.
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Old 07-31-2019, 06:39 PM   #12
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

Note about my comments regarding propane heat. Make sure that your yurt is vented. I just read online that the fumes can kill you. I never considered that when I made my posts. So -those that actually listen to what I have to say, don't die from propane fumes and sue me. haha
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Old 08-01-2019, 09:50 AM   #13
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

Moisture

is your #1 concern when it comes to

heating

. Over insulate at your peril. There is a reason why the word moisture is automatically hyperlinked when you post it here.

The biggest mistake I see people make with yurts is that they try to insulate them like they would a traditional home. A traditional home has vents in the eaves and ridge vents, not to mention in bathrooms and kitchens. Do you see any vents in a yurt? Generally no.

Your yurt MUST breath. That means generally, oversizing your heating unit, whatever it may be. It means that to a degree, less is more when it comes to

insulation

.
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Old 08-03-2019, 05:06 AM   #14
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

Wise comments about moisture in yurt.


Wetness is a key factor in decay and degradation of organic materials. In my view mold and mildew are some of the very first agents in the natural cycle of everything ultimately 'returning to the earth'.
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Old 12-06-2019, 03:03 PM   #15
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jafo View Post
Moisture is your #1 concern when it comes to heating.

... A traditional home has vents in the eaves and ridge vents, not to mention in bathrooms and kitchens. Do you see any vents in a yurt? Generally no.

Your yurt MUST breath. ...
Good to know. I assume a

dome

lifter would be considered a good vent, when you open it?

Also, for those that use wood stoves, do people generally just let the supply side air "leak" into the yurt interior? Or do you do an outside air intake?
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Old 12-06-2019, 06:55 PM   #16
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

The

dome

is fine, though may be bigger than you want. I use the outside air intake. It really does make a difference.
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Old 01-26-2023, 12:14 AM   #17
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

I'm very late to this parade but this might be useful to some folks coming along later.

We live on a ger camp in the mountains of Mongolia at quite high altitude about 1700m (5500') and have an extremely cold winter. Just a deep freeze though. This week it's been in the -40's (C or F doesn't make a difference). So heating is about survival not just being cozy.

I have 2 x 7m (23' dia) 'gers' (Mongolian word for yurts) of a modern design and one 6m traditional 'ger' which we lived in while the modern ones were being built. We live in the modern ones now and keep the traditional one for summer guests. The modern ones are not your traditional Mongolian gers by any means but they are our main residence because they are practically houses.

Summer view:
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Autumn view:
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Winter view:
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We have a combination heating strategy with backups. The primary heat is electric underfloor heating. Each one is 40m/2 internally (about 430 sq ft) and there's 27m/2 of heating mats in each. This works well but slowly and it costs quite a lot to run even with cheap electricity rates here in Mongolia. There's not much to see because it's all hidden, unless you go to Infra Red:

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The secondary heating is German wood stoves. They are claimed to be efficient dual-burners or something better than standard. They offer a heat top-up on cold evenings or whenever we need quicker heat. They vent through the roof, add a lot of ambience and can raise the temperature relatively quickly. Too much sometimes so you have to control the burn with double vents. The downside is they need a lot of attention so we can't run them at night when it gets really cold.

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Then to the backups. We have a propane room heater. This is fierce but it needs to be vented carefully. Leave the crown open and put the heater under the crown or if it's primary, get a vented version. It heats up almost instantly and runs more conveniently than the other sources. It has 3 bars (3=furnace, 2=roaring fire, 1=a hot day in Saigon).


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I also have a diesel burner which is pretty good but you need to vent in and out. My wife complained of the fumes because they were blowing back towards the ger (this time a traditional one) and gers are porous. So we keep it for emergency use for the out buildings. The theory is good and it has a thermostat.

The exhaust:
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So, we have a mix and match approach. If your nights aren't too cold, I'd go with a wood burner. Mongolians use this to heat and cook. For eons this has been wood or dung burning. More recently they've moved to coal which can burn all night, if done right, but it's rather nasty to handle. It requires a different stove. We've got the traditional wood burner in the traditional ger.

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Finally, in our gers we get loads of passive solar heat through our glass windows, doors and crown. We can turn the heating off completely when the sun comes up. Luckily, despite being a very cold country, Mongolia's winter is very sunny.
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Last edited by UKadventurer; 01-26-2023 at 12:21 AM.
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Old 01-26-2023, 02:15 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UKadventurer View Post
I'm very late to this parade but this might be useful to some folks coming along later.
It looks like, that the absence of your Lady brings a lot of free time for you.

But you´re doing well in sharing details & insights of you experiences.

Keep on doing....
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Old 01-26-2023, 03:52 AM   #19
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Default Re: Heating a yurt

Quote:
Originally Posted by TSRalex View Post
It looks like, that the absence of your Lady brings a lot of free time for you.

But you´re doing well in sharing details & insights of you experiences.

Keep on doing....
Hahaha, you're totally right. I've got endless free time.

I'm retired + it's deep winter + my lady's absent = lots of free time to post online.
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Old 01-26-2023, 04:06 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UKadventurer View Post
Hahaha, you're totally right. I've got endless free time.

I'm retired + it's deep winter + my lady's absent = lots of free time to post online.
If you´re willing to extend your mind in an unbelievable dimension you should use the time for having a closer look on AI (e.g. ChatGPT)....

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