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Wooden Panel Yurt In South Australia

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Old 04-22-2016, 07:34 AM   #11
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

Well, for myself, the land had been passed down for the last 4 generations. I couldn't wait for it, so I just bought it off my father lol.. Mine is a hunting camp though, so a completely different set of objectives.

I like your beach idea and wineries to boot!
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Old 04-22-2016, 10:04 PM   #12
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

My wife and I (and our respective families) have all lived in small homes or apts. All of us and that is alot of people. I never minded that, but when I had the finances to buy property I bought totally undeveloped acreage outside the city limits. Well, septic, leach field, gas line, electricity off the pole, none of it was in. Even if we were completely off grid we would still pay property tax and

insurance

. There is just no getting away from the taxman and not insuring your home is absolute foolishness. imo.

As far as finding it, my wife did the legwork. She showed me different properties she found by actual looking there was no internet then. We agreed on this place here and the rest is history.
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Old 04-23-2016, 05:28 AM   #13
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

Thank you for your stories! We had a long day of looking at properties - revisited one that is 4 1/2 acres - rural, no power, water, etc. - but still close enough to to amenities to get by. Another was 1.7 acres, overlooking vineyards - same price (around $385k - land is more expensive in Australia than the US). Also, not too far from amenities, and needs all the utilities put in. We are leaning toward the larger property, has a more peaceful, isolated feel, but will do more research. Either would be suitable for a yurt, or two, or three. Will keep you posted : )
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Old 04-23-2016, 02:54 PM   #14
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

We looked at probably six properties but that was in 1987 so I don't recall the exact count. Once you have seen a few properties you start to get a feel for what you are doing and how to look at them, and what you like. btw that is also an advantage when interviewing contractors. You start to get a feel for them as well after meeting a few. You'll know when you have found the right place and the right guys.

That's quite the investment for property so make sure a lawyer and your agents are all in on the sale, and everything is in writing and legal. Get a survey if necessary. Look for boundary pins or stakes. Don't trust the real estate people know the property stakes. Their interest is in making the sale. They might no the pins, and then again they might not and are guessing. I have had experience with neighbors that got their property boundaries from 'might nots'. lol Have fun and good luck.
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Old 04-23-2016, 06:15 PM   #15
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Thanks for the advice Bob, I appreciate it.
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Old 04-23-2016, 07:12 PM   #16
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You're welcome.
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:35 AM   #17
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

I am with Bob, insist on a survey and know where the pins are. In particular don't trust old fence lines.

We recently bought a piece of land here in Ecuador, it was supposedly surveyed when we bought, but when we went to register the deed we lost more than 1,000 square meters. A math error in the previous deed they said. In addition we found out the old fence was 10 meters over on our land along the whole south boundary effectively giving the neighbor an additional 288 meters *10 meters. 2880 +1000 = 3880 square meters.

That is more than a 1/3 of a hectare, just shy of an acre. (A hectare is 10,000 square meters, approximately 2.47 acres for us Americans who are generally metrically impaired.) When you buy here, you buy by the square meter, so we had the privilege of paying for those 3880 square meters.

When we talked to the neighbor, he starts into an angry rant about how the surveyors don't know anything, and they don't know what they are doing, and my land used to belong to his family, and some so and so from 2 generations ago had stolen this land from his ... and.... and... Umm, but I bought it from a member of his family. Not sure how that worked.

Truth be told, I have 2 members of my family that are surveyors, and they tell me that several times a year they run into errors that were made sometime in the past that have to be mediated and corrected before the deed can be registered. Often/Usually/Sometimes that means going to court.

I don't really like court, or lawyers, particularly in foreign countries. I have enough trouble understanding legalese in my native tongue.

You get the idea. Resolution is still up in the air. We will have to file paperwork with the county to get them to send a county surveyor, (at our expense), to come and mediate the property line. Yuck. That also does not help with local animosity, and bad juju about "those foreigners" who are moving in.

I will also gently suggest that you meet your neighbors before you buy, if you plan to live on the property, and even if they don't live on the property, which this particular neighbor does not. It can be a hassle to find them I know.

On another note, we have been waiting more than six months for a decision from the county government, and finally got approval last Friday afternoon to proceed with our plans. Next we have to get approval from the local indigenous community government for our plans, and then we can truly, actually proceed.

The local power company is coming today to "inspect", and give us a "parts list" of what we need to provide to them, so they can then come and put up a temporary power pole. I think they said it can stay in position for only 3 months, but in the confusion of languages, I may be a little off. Three months seems awfully quick, particularly considering how rapidly most things proceed; perhaps it was 30.

Last week we made an application to the local community for drinking water. I wish I could say it was a formality, since clean drinking water is a "legal right" in the national constitution here, but we still have to make application, wait until the next community water board meeting, and then come and present our case of "why we need water". Some have been turned down, or their flow restricted in the past, but not often.

If that should happen, there is an appeals process, by applying to the national government. Needless to say, no one likes getting the government into their business, but the community can use the process of application to put you off until you can get the attention of the government, and right now the government has their hands full dealing with the earthquake. I am not really expecting a problem, but I am an optimist.

I think we are still at least a month out on that meeting, much less the actual permission process, much less burying pipe, so I expect the we will be carrying water up the mountain to mix concrete. This week we are starting repairs on an old, small watchman's casita at the top of the property. It is about 39 square meters, roughly 390 square feet, and the projection is it will take about 3 months to repair.

I keep reminding myself that this process anywhere takes patience, and here it takes even more patience, since we have the difficulty of language thrown in.

Maybe I am complaining a little, but I would be complaining if I was "back home" as well. I have yet to meet anyone who told me that they liked beaurocracy, just those who understand the need.

Best of luck on your adventure. Your mileage may vary.

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Old 04-25-2016, 07:16 PM   #18
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

My comments here are gonna have nothing to do with yurts so read no further.

About bureacracy. Gov't is funded by taxes. Gov't is totally out of touch with any free enterprise methodology. The money automatically flows in consistently, without fail, regardless of good, average, or poor performance. There is absolutely no incentive to get things done quickly, on time, and WITHIN BUDGET. There is no client. There is nothing to be sold. As such gov't is the flip side of private enterprise. In gov't people are more concerned with their power, or lack of, getting their share of the next fiscal years allotment of funds, their perks and their retirement. Free enterprise ais all about getting after it, getting it done in a timely fashion, within budget, and competition regulates the money being made. Gov't is the exact opposite.
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Old 04-25-2016, 08:06 PM   #19
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

Thank you for sharing your experience MT Rod. Sounds like you are living the 'life is a journey not a destination' quote : )

I am with you when it comes to keeping the peace, knowing your neighbours, etc. Would prefer to live in a harmonious environment. I wonder what you will learn, who you will meet, and how your life will be influenced by this experience. I have found that what appears challenging can end up being quite a gift down the road.

All the best to you!
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Old 04-25-2016, 09:04 PM   #20
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Default Re: Wooden panel yurt in South Australia

Haha, I'm sure I sound whiny, but I am here because I love it. If I sound discouraged, I am not so much... occasionally a little frustrated.

I love a new experience, and I have been inventing and reinventing my life for the last many years. Good, bad or indifferent, it can all work out OK.

We are in the middle of making some big decisions. We are trying to move forward on our newly allowed project and looking at 3 other "maybe's" in the background. There isn't enough time in the day and night to make me happy at the moment, hahaha. Well I guess that is part of what keeps me happy.

Best of luck on your decision and projects.


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