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Bit By The Yurt Bug

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Old 02-24-2016, 03:42 PM   #1
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Default Bit by the yurt bug

Got bit by the yurt bug yesterday gathered enough lumber to start a 16 foot yurt. Wall and door frame. Dumpster diving can be very rewarding. Now I need to make up my mind about the roof ring. Been wanting to try some thing different. Laminating luwan. Around a tractor trailer tire screwing the first layer from the inside out and grinding the ends off .adding a couple layers holding them with ratchet straps till the glue dries.then taking the screws out and removing the tire. Who knows just might work.

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Old 02-24-2016, 07:16 PM   #2
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

That sounds promising. Good luck Marshall. Keep us posted. I like my 16'er.
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Old 02-25-2016, 07:07 AM   #3
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

How heavy are those rims?
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Old 02-25-2016, 06:07 PM   #4
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

I'm going to add until it is about an inch thick the Luwan is close to quarter inch thick I'm Hoping I can get it to bend with out breaking . I already have a cover from my third yurt that the frame was takin from our camp ground lot.
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Old 02-25-2016, 07:08 PM   #5
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

Bending wood is totally out of my field of expertise. I have dry bent (no steam) lams a few times making trim, but they weren't subjected to any load. I'm really looking forward to reading here how it is going for you, so please keep us posted on your project. Thanks Marshall.
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Old 03-02-2016, 09:37 AM   #6
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

I use a heat gun to bend wood for recurve bows, I bend wood up to 3/4" thick ash, mostly though 1/4 to 1/2" wood. A big tire wheel should work well I would think. I loosely clamp the wood on the form, heat the part to be curved and slowly tighten the clamps, a gradual process. I was wondering about a 4' ring, I think this has got a lot of potential. What kind of glue are you using? I've used Loctite 3 and hide glue.
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Old 03-02-2016, 05:50 PM   #7
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

Hide glue has tremendous working time. Unfortunately, it is not at all waterproof. I don't think it would be appropriate for a yurt ring? Consider the load it carries and the possibility of delamination failure due to

moisture

enetering the glue. I don't know, just a guess. I would think a slow cure epoxy might be the way to. That's also a guess. As I mentioned this is something I know little about.
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Old 03-02-2016, 07:33 PM   #8
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

I was thinking gorilla glue works good with water.glue soaks into wood pours and helps it bond so making the wood wet makes it bend easier and also helps the glue to bond better. That's what I have read so far.I am going to let it warm up a bit though before I start anything.
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Old 03-03-2016, 07:19 AM   #9
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

I have laminated a number of bow staves with hide glue that have been soaked often, but they have very good sealers on them. A 2 part epoxy is great, lots of good choices. I hadn't thought of using luan but the more I think about it the better it looks. For the ring I am considering it would be 3-4' dia. and probably 4" wide at least. For 12' poles.
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Old 03-03-2016, 08:23 PM   #10
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Default Re: Bit by the yurt bug

Building a steam bending box is pretty easy, actually. I have only done it once but it is pretty quick as well. Enough for a tono shouldn't be too hard, as long as it will fit inside a 4" pipe. My mentor had done the same thing, but built the steam chamber out of 2 - 1"x6" and 2 - 1"x8" used to form the steam chamber.

Heat control is the only tricky part, if there is any tricky part. You will need a camp stove or a electric hot plate, I have even heard of it done with an iron as the heat source.

Get a piece of 4" plastic pipe longer than your wooden pieces and 2 - 4" glue on and screw on fittings with the screw on end caps.

I also bought some 1/2" pipe and a 1/2" junction and a 45 degree angle and the connector to screw 1/2" copper to 1/2" plastic pipe, and about a foot of 1/2" copper pipe.

Almost finished with the parts list, the last part is a NEW one gallon can that had a nipple in the cap and a piece of flexible plastic pipe on that nipple to help you pour more easily. I don't remember the size, but I remember that I had to buy some adaptive fittings to get the 1/2" copper small enough to fit the nipple on the gas can lid.

Drill a hole in one of the screw in end caps, very close to the edge of the cap so that you can glue in a piece of the 1/2" pipe. You don't want it to extend inside much at all, close to flush with the inside of the pipe cap. It doesn't have to be very sturdy if you are careful with it.

In the other end cap drill a 1/16" hole. Glue the end cap female parts on the ends of the pipe. When the glue is dry you can screw in the end cap, just finger tight. In the other end you can do the same, just to be sure they screw in easily.

I hung the pipe with a rope from a garage rafter, not too high. I used the high end to load the steamer. The angle should be about 45 degrees, and the 1/2" pipe should be on the bottom, so the condensate can run out the pipe. I glued a junction on the end of the 1/2" pipe, and on the other end of the junction the plastic to metal adapter, and then soldered the necessary adapters to get from the nipple on the cap to the 1/2" copper.

Fill the gas can 3/4 full of water, set it on the heat source, screw the lid on the gas can and adjust it so that the low end of the 4" pipe with 45 angle and connector etc. lines up so the steam from the water is directed up the 1/2" pipe and into the 4" pipe.

Screw the end cap out of the upper end of the pipe and load your wood into the pipe and turn on the heat. When you begin to see just a little steam coming out of the upper end of the pipe, screw on the upper cap with the 1/16" hole. You don't want to build a pressure cooker, just a steamer, so make sure the to build up, so make sure the hole stays clear.

A little steam should come out of the upper hole, but you don't want much to escape, so adjust the heat until just a little comes out. In theory the steam will condense in the upper end and run back down the pipe and back into the gallon can.

In my case I ran the wood in the steamer for about 2 hours, put on some heavy leather gloves and reversed the wood, and cooked it for another 1 1/2 hours. When it came out it was very flexible. I was a little nervous about the can running out of water, so I poured some boiling water down the pipe and let it put more into the boiling can. I don't remember if it was really necessary or not, it has been many years. I do remember I could have an idea of how full it was by the sound of the water trickling into the can.

Remember to get the proper alignment on the lower pipe. You want it to let any condensation to get back into your supply of water so it won't just run dry and burn your gallon can to the burner.

I was bending 3/8" x 1 7/8" ash to use in a stick and canvas kayak that I never managed to finish before I moved away. It turned out to be heavier than I was hoping for.

I think I still have the can and connections sitting somewhere in my storage, but I gave the 4" pipe away long ago. It was too awkward to store.

I'm not sure if my description is clear, but I hope my poor drawing will help, if I can figure out how to upload it.

I'm not sure how the wet wood would effect the glue. You might have to tie it in place until it cooled and dried again before you glued it.

Type to you later,


Rod
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