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View Poll Results: How is your yurt handling the cold?
Great! Just as good as any other structure 3 37.50%
Good, but having condensation issues 2 25.00%
Good, but having to use a lot of fuel 3 37.50%
Not good at all 0 0%
Voters: 8. You may not vote on this poll

How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

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Old 01-30-2014, 06:46 PM   #21
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

I installed a wood stove in my 16'er. The wood stove is too small for my uninsulted, unsealed yurt. To make it warmer where I usually sit, and nap lol, I installed a canvas tarp over a frame erected around my cot. Tarp camping inside the yurt. lol

If I lived in that yurt full time, I'd definitely have it fully insulated. Wall, roof and floor. Plus, a better seal around the door, and better wall canvas attachment at the door frame. And, have a bigger stove. 'What works and what doesn't' is pretty much all figured out by just doing it. Kinda like life in general, huh?
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Old 03-25-2014, 07:01 PM   #22
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Very interesting thread, I'd be interested in whether these yurts were Mongolian style or commercial versions and which companys.

Its a fact that in Mongolia cold is often, well under 0 F with very strong winds, and

heating

is usually with dung fired stoves, not a whole lot of btus there. Otohm they will have up to five layers of felt under the roof cover, and comparable on the walls, with rug and other hangings inside.

My reservation of the commercial models I have seen on this site, is the amount of

insulation

used, plus higher walls and a lot more air space to heat.

Myself, I have a solid cast iron stove, takes up to 18' pcs, it will go under the tono, to radiate heat over the whole area, not one section by a wall. Much more to find out on this, it gets at least to -25 F here in northern MI, and colder in the part of ID I am looking at moving to. Much to think on of this topic.
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Old 03-25-2014, 10:59 PM   #23
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Jake, if you opt for the 24' yurt, and live in a bitter cold climate that regularly hangs at zero and below, I'm thinking you will be firing that wood stove all day to keep it toasty in there. Alot of the volume of a yrt is up high, above the occupants.

IMO that's the reason Mongolian yurts aren't over five feet tall, (usually closer to 4')and have very low pitched roof systems. Cutting the volume and the height makes the occupants warmer, and less fuel needs burned.

My uninsulated traditional drafty 16' yurt has less than half the volume of a 24' yurt, and my little 1.5 cu ft air tight wood stove might heat it to 40 degrees running wide open when its zero outside.

If I were to bring it up to the standards of a Pacific or Colorado yurt, it would hold the heat better. A 24' yurt that isn't full on well built and tight, and insulated, is a huge space to heat in zero temps, based on my experience with

heating

my little 16'er this past winter. Just saying.
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Old 03-26-2014, 03:17 AM   #24
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Here's where I got my 16' (5 metre) yurt from: Introduction - Yurt Specialists -Makers & Suppliers of traditional Yurts

Here's my stove: http://www.windysmithy.co.uk/woodburners/louis-ranger

I don't my yurt it has a higher roof, I think those tend to be the kazakh yurts here.

Although there's more space to heat in a taller yurt I wouldn't see that as being much of a problem with a fan to move the air around. I find flailing my arms around like a windmill in the middle of the yurt, helps.

If you're going to be keeping your stove going constantly then I'd see a bit of draught as being useful to feed the fire. Especially if the stove is placed to the side of the yurt near the door where it can heat the cold air up on the way in. Otherwise the stove will just suck all the air out of the yurt. I feel safer, tidier and cleaner with the stove at the side by the door.

The door in my yurt is the draughtiest part but that is easily remedied by sticking a thick duvet over it.

I'm not in a really cold climate though! This winter gone it wasn't cold, it was mild and very, very wet. The winter before was very cold (not the coldest) and very long and I only had a little radiator instead of the stove. The stove sometimes gets too hot (my fault really!) and I fully expect it to continue getting too hot even when it's exceptionally cold outside. The main issue is retention of that heat but if it becomes the case that you have to keep the stove going, retention shouldn't be an issue.

Last edited by Joe Chapman; 03-26-2014 at 03:20 AM.
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Old 03-26-2014, 04:30 AM   #25
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jake View Post
Very interesting thread, I'd be interested in whether these yurts were Mongolian style or commercial versions and which companys.
The yurt mentionned under #18 is a 4-wall-could-not-be-more-authentic Mongolian yurt :-). It is not only the

insulation

(here only one layer of 100% natural special grey/ white felt), but indeed the compact shape of the Mongolian ger that makes it so efficient.
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Old 03-26-2014, 07:46 AM   #26
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Thanks for the input. They/its is/are appreciated.

My answer, my plan is for a 21' or 24' dia, with 5.5' wall. My stove will be in the center, or immediately off center by the Baganna. Paired witha 2 burner propane on the counter by the wall.

I wintered in the yukon, in an uninsulated cabin, too high of a roof, about everything wrong with it that could be. It got cold, like -24 F in the morning, only difference between it and sleeping in the dog sled on the trail was the roof. So, the yurt as I am planning it has GOT to be warmer.

A slight aside here, I am seeing about four distinct applications of yurt designs here, a stricter Mongolian model,the most portable, a 'gentrified' one with added in conventional western touches, and then a straight western approach and materials put into a yurt design for a more conventional home. Then homes with a yurt profile and not a lot more, I find nothing wrong with any of them. For their purposes.

Its different strokes for different folks.

For my situation I am leaning towards the 2nd one, the traditional with some simple additions, I wont say improvements even though they are for my needs.

I read of Gers in Mongolia with up to 4-5 felt layers under the roof/outer cover, and several under the wall cover with more rugs and hanging inside the lattice. Even so, water freezes in the tea pot overnight. But they warm up fast once the fire is started. Life goes on, in literally hundreds of thousands of them.

I am leaning/working towards the traditional with several adjustments in the design , two 'conventional' windows, in what amounts to their own khana, a slightly wider door, dutch style, with some insulation in the core. I want a tono, with adjustable opening , I am exploring different ways to do it or an existing commercial or imported model. The bagana as a backup in case of snow load, or overload.

A completely portable ger has an advantage over a stationary one in being able to clearly see what needs replacing/repair when taken down and set up. Something that we in the west easily overlook. Something I am going to try to stay aware of.

I have written several manufacturers/importers for more information on different aspects of their products, mine when up and operating will be a hybrid, of traditional and western additions.

You folks are so encouraging on your approaches that I almost made the decision to go for the 30' ger, but, practicality over-rode that, I just dont need or would use the extra space. So for year round living I believe the 24' one will do me quite well. An addendum; lifestyle and interests have a MAJOR effect and coloring and influence on what we deem neccesary for our needs.

Myself, I am a homesteader, hunter, archer(stick bows I make), homestead chicken flock(small), and seasonal goat packer, hiking and camping with my goats and dogs. I will in all probability in the winter have the bow horse near one of the windows so I can carve bow staves as the snow deepens, and an outdoor shed/shop to do the same in on rainy days in the summer. I also moderate two email lists, so being online is a given. All add in and up to what I as everyone else want, while not needing what I dont need and comfortable with that.

I seriously believe that the yurt basic design is what is so appealing to so many of us with different lifestyles. And why so many actually different manufacturers can meet so many different needs and lifestyles. Viva la difference ! Or something like that.

I am looking forward to seeing all of the different inputs as the winter wans and warm weather approaches. And my own plans continue. I am seriously considering taking the cut Ash for my lattice and rafters with me when I do move west. It will fit nicely bundled on the floor of my van . Or in a uhaul. The later needed for my shop stuff which I dont want to have to replace.

I have narrowed my 'place' down to either ID, or WA, leaning towards ID, several small communities in the central area. We shall see. I will be out there through July, probably longer. And then displace. My son gets to babysit my Icelandic Chickens while I am gone, the goats will make the first trip west and then visit with a friends stock while I come back for the rest. A whole lotta gas gonna get used this year, but, thanks to the Irish Traveller genes, its all part of life.

Enjoy !
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Old 03-26-2014, 08:21 AM   #27
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

a small remark about Mongolia: the yurts / gers are most usually 5-walls, around 20' diameter (also many 4 and some 6 walls - respectively 16 and 22' diameter). They will of course loose efficiency by becoming bigger.
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Old 03-26-2014, 09:22 AM   #28
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Bonjour Yves

That is what I have been reading, I really wish I could make a trip over there, ideally during Nadaam in July. Both to see the hornbows up close and personal as well as the same for yurts.

But, if I did, would have to postpone the building of the yurt.

To help compensate I have a number of videos, including the Mongolian made one of the family building theirs, in English The Craftsman. A beautiful story, I have almost worn out my copy. There are others also, and a few really good books. I cringe at thinking what I wonder if I can do , with my tools then watch him with a hand axe . Self inflicted inferiority knowledge in view of true crafsmen. The biggest problem I need to overcome is getting in a hurry on each job. I think the cost of material keeps them focused and taking care.

If all goes well I am going to start three hornbows this fall. Using a max of natural glues will stretch out the total time to give them drying/curing time. Carving out the 3 ash cores will be the quickest and easiest. Nother tale.

Yves I am looking forward to viewing your catalog when its available. Maybe if all goes well I can make a trip to Montreal before I move west.
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Old 04-03-2014, 08:19 AM   #29
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Default Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

HI Jake! just replied to your message in PM...
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Old 04-03-2014, 09:29 AM   #30
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Thumbs up Re: How's Your Yurt Handling The Cold?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Rowlands View Post
Jake, if you opt for the 24' yurt, and live in a bitter cold climate that regularly hangs at zero and below, I'm thinking you will be firing that wood stove all day to keep it toasty in there. Alot of the volume of a yrt is up high, above the occupants.

IMO that's the reason Mongolian yurts aren't over five feet tall, (usually closer to 4')and have very low pitched roof systems. Cutting the volume and the height makes the occupants warmer, and less fuel needs burned.

My uninsulated traditional drafty 16' yurt has less than half the volume of a 24' yurt, and my little 1.5 cu ft air tight wood stove might heat it to 40 degrees running wide open when its zero outside.

If I were to bring it up to the standards of a Pacific or Colorado yurt, it would hold the heat better. A 24' yurt that isn't full on well built and tight, and insulated, is a huge space to heat in zero temps, based on my experience with heating my little 16'er this past winter. Just saying.
Good points Bob

I found in the Yukon that without a good controllable damper in the stove pipe that it does take feeding a stove all night, but, loading it up, & setting the damper lets it hold coals all night. The trick being setting the damper to let enough smoke exit to prevent creosote buildup without emptying out the wood load.

As I said before, I am planning for a 5.5' sidewall, a 7' likely center. I will be using a real pair of Tono suports rather then ornamental ones just to help on snow load, along with Simpson fascinded rafters and walls. Thankfully the Central part of Idaho doesnt get as heavy snow as we get here in northern MI. But this winters snowfall here has been a good reminder and lesson to build and prepare for this much. Ya never know what will be.

I enjoy reading yours and Jafos posts, I get a lot out of them and have adjusted my plans accordingly as I read. Thanks gentlemen, its appreciated your time spent here.
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