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wrdanner 06-08-2015 05:03 PM

Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Has anyone here used a Rocket Mass Heater (Stove) inside their yurt? I'm looking to build a 30' yurt in the near future and it looks like it will require a serious heat source, bigger than I expected. I would think a Rocket Mass Heater would help by retaining heat in the dirt/other dense material after burning.

We're building our yurt attached to a shed/garage (which has the bathroom and laundry) so we're also considering traditional HVAC using gas heat but based on the things I'm seeing on the forum it sounds like it would require a large unit and would use lots of gas.

We're building in southern North Carolina, on the coast.

Jafo 06-08-2015 05:52 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I have no experience with them, but I do understand they are very heavy. You will want to make sure your foundation can support it. They are also labor intensive.

I seem to recall Steve at Surely Yurts had some experience with them, he may chime in.

Bob Rowlands 06-09-2015 09:03 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I'm unfamiliar with rocket mass heater. If there's dirt or rammed earth in them I'm guessing that's for affordability. Going off on a $$$ tangent here, Fine Homebuilding hardbacks from the 1980s have several good articles about masonry fireplaces. All require a substantial concrete foundation. A void in the yurts floor framing would be required.

A traditional gas fired forced air system could heat or cool your yurt pronto, since a yurt of 30' is 706 sq. ft. There's no flywheel effect like with a masonry heater. Fast to heat or cool at your fingertip. Less costly. Every heating outfit knows them inside out. Any wood yurt foundation will support the furnace and supply ducts.

As far as fuel economy, that would totally depend on how well insulated and sealed your yurt is. No yurt approaches a conventional 2x4 framed house for holding heat or cool. But the heated/cooled cubic footage of a 30' yurt is half that of even a 1400 sq ft house, so to me it would be a wash.

Good luck.

hierony 06-09-2015 03:26 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I haven't gotten there yet, but I plan on making a sort of masonry heater for my portable 20' yurt. First I need to finish my insulation and layering and get my platform moved and seal everything up though. I have a cheap adjustable 25k btu/hr propane heater in the mean time to test how much heating power I actually need--yurts can work _very_ differently from traditional homes in terms of heating, throwing off estimates. My cost estimate so far is ~$2k for a masonry heater with design by professionals/construction by myself, for what it's worth.

There's a good number of ways to build masonry heaters (varies by country/region of origin, air movement principles)--the RMH are tempting for their DIY nature and typical lack of engineering. But if you keep a sharp ear on what people say during builds, they require a good bit of tuning to get working just right & efficiently. Partnering with someone knowledgeable about them & air flow dynamics, and hopefully local, would probably be a good idea.

Like Jafo says, make sure your foundation/platform can take it--with a basic heat lose estimate, you can fairly easily estimate the required thermal mass based on frequency and wood mass of burns. Standard wood decks should hold 40 psf live load--a 5' square could hold 1000 lbs by that standard. A ballpark weight is probably 1000-5000 lbs for a small/medium homemade heater.

A note on insulation: 2x4's have an r-value of ~4, windows from 1-4. Insulation gets cut out for electrical boxes, pipes, etc. Plus nails (metal is a good conductor) and imperfect installation. So you're actual total r-value of the whole wall assembly is not that of the insulation (although it can be close). A yurt doesn't have this problem--it uses a layer of insulation with no interruptions from studs or nails or framing. Mind you, the materials are also usually thinner (except when the mongolians use 5 layers of 1" thick felt during winter...). Yurts also have negligible thermal mass compared to most other construction techniques.

Hopefully Steve will have some experience/info to add.

What are you making your platform out of? Are you building or buying your yurt? How do you plan to insulate it?

Hope that helps a bit.

Bob Rowlands 06-09-2015 07:54 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Last Friday I hung the entry door on the next custom home I'm going to trim. The insulators were in there. Nowdays EVERY gap to the outside of the house gets a bead of foam. I mean every gap. At ganged studs, every seam between the studs. Plate lines between double plate and top plate. Around windows doors etc. Add R19 insulation (R13 in a 2x4 wall), R38 in attic, tyvek, sheetrock, texture and paint, and you have an R package and 'tightness' factor that exceeds a trad yurt by quite a margin. No yurt has 3.5" fiberglass batts on it, that I know of. As for many layers of felt, I'm unfamiliar with that. Just sayin.

Zelig 06-11-2015 03:45 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
[QUOTE=hierony;5409] (except when the mongolians use 5 layers of 1" thick felt during winter...). QUOTE]

Can you elaborate on where you heard how much felt the Mongolians use? We've got two 1/2" layers of felt for our yet-to-be-erected yurt and you're making me nervous. Mind you, I was somewhat nervous to begin with.

hierony 06-11-2015 06:34 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Zelig,

I did a quick internet search, and everything I found was vague in terms of felt thickness. I have however read that some people's stay-overs in mongolia have been in uninsulated yurts in which one could find many direct holes to the cold outsides :( Who has what quality/quantity of insulation is understandably variable.

I need to double check, but I believe that comes from Paul King's book, which is in a stack of books somewhere... A quick summary of what I remember off hand: the mongolians, being nomadic shepherds, had lots of sheep and thus wool to make lots of felt. Not being farmers, they didn't have cotton for canvas/liners. They'd use the felt, layering up during the winter to hold in more heat/protect against the winds. I think he said the felt was 1" thick and they'd use 5 or more layers during the coldest times, with some being older felts. But I suspect the 1" thickness may be slightly exaggerated/inconsistent. With a cotton cover, canvas, maybe some tyvek, and your two layers of 1/2" felt you should be well ahead of them.

One thing to consider: you can seal up your yurt a bit better than old school traditional yurts. They have a crown ring in part to allow smoke from an open fire to escape--you get to use stove pipe and not have a giant opening in your roof. Also, your fuel (wood?) is up to two times more energy dense than dried camel/pony/sheep dung...

Bob Rowlands 06-11-2015 07:20 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Also, your fuel (wood?) is up to two times more energy dense than dried camel/pony/sheep dung...

lol Now I really have heard it all! :D

thebitmaster 06-12-2015 12:05 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
The most modern RMH info is coming through Paul Wheaton's Permaculture Podcast, and you can get to info on them here:

rocket stove mass heater

The most advanced ones have almost no particulate exhaust and are getting upwards of 20x as much efficiency as a wood stove. They are also super fussy. There are simpler ones that are still the most efficient way to heat a home. There are also several episodes of the podcast where they geek out on the details for, literally, hours. I'm almost disappointed that I live in Texas, where having one would be useless. :)

Zelig 06-12-2015 03:13 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hierony (Post 5423)
I need to double check, but I believe that comes from Paul King's book.

I have Becky Kemery's book and all I found in there was reference to "sometimes several layers" of felt. No mention of thickness or number of layers.

I do believe that my insulated chimney, lexan toono covering and house wrap will give us some advantage over old school yurts as you mentioned, but I'm wondering what the btu rating of dried dog turds might be. Perhaps birch would be a better bet.

Bob Rowlands 06-13-2015 09:00 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
'..what's the btu of dried dog turds..' heh heh I love this place. :D

MT Rod 06-15-2015 01:21 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Pioneers crossed the US plains doing most of their cooking over dried buffalo poop. I have read a bunch of journals recalling it was the kids job to pick up dried turds and toss them in a bucket tied on the back of the wagon.

We should try to look up dog turd BTUs, you can find almost anything on the internet:D.

Maybe you just need a bigger dog? Hehe


Rod
rod::email::yurtlocker.com

Marshall Eppley 06-15-2015 05:42 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
There are loads of YouTube videos on rocket stoves and mass heaters

hierony 06-15-2015 06:46 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I found some rough numbers for dung energy density on wikipedia, but I'll have to look for more precise & authoritative numbers :p

Zelig: I found the book--it actually said 1/2" felt on the sides, 1" felt on the roof with up to 5 layers during the winter.

MT Rod 06-16-2015 09:29 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
While you are looking Heirony, could you be sure to find those figures in Metric units. I am just getting more and more used to that way of doing things, :D.

BTUs per cubic meter of dog turds (does that make it DTUs? (Dog Turd Units)) just sounds so much more official.

As for felt layers and thickness, travelling, I never saw any felt on a yurt in Mongolia that I would guess to be as thin as a inch, most was more than an inch but I would guess less than but close to 1 3/8". I didn't have my calipers. They also seemed to have at least 2 layers on the roofs that I saw, and it just hung down on the sides, so I am guessing the walls were 2 layers also since they were not separate pieces, the roof and wall, at least not when I noticed.

It was all sort of a charcoal, dark grey color felt, and that was the yurt material. When I really looked, they just had a light polyester or muslin on the inside and what looked to maybe be a nylon cover that was white that they put over the outside. I am guessing to make it not so dark inside and to make it look prettier on the outside. When it rained this outer cover was not waterproof, it soaked through. We were rained on a lot while we travelled there, but the roofs didn't leak through.

I am not saying they all did things this way, it is just what I noticed in the places where we stayed. We had 2 nights in a touristy place, the rest of the time we just rolled up to a friendly looking yurt and our translators asked if they had space. Usually they would move to one another family member's yurt and gave the 4 of us the yurt. They liked having the cash.

One night we could not find space, so we slept in our own tents. Luckily that night it didn't rain. When it rains it is a cold driving rain, and I sure got used to sleeping near a wood-stove on a fairly comfortable couch in a warm dry sleeping bag. Not quite glamping, but...


Rod
rod::email::yurtlocker.com

Marshall Eppley 06-16-2015 05:55 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
There is a lot of videos on YouTube on bio mass rocket stoves kinda wondering how it would work out. Portability would go right out the window though.

Zelig 06-16-2015 06:06 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by MT Rod (Post 5436)
We should try to look up dog turd BTUs, you can find almost anything on the internet:D.

Maybe you just need a bigger dog? Hehe


Rod
rod::email::yurtlocker.com

I'm sure that the dog's diet will have some bearing on the DTU content. Luckily for me, my two retrievers have a fondness for gnawing on branches and logs, as well as eating dried leaves and weeds. If I could train them to preferentially seek out higher BTU woods species, then their DTU value should increase.

Bob Rowlands 06-16-2015 06:17 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
DTUs lol Love it.

hierony 06-17-2015 12:49 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Thank you Rod! I've always been curious about how the mongolians do gers--your observations add a lot of insight.

I'll be sure to convert any numbers I find :P I just moved and got internets back up, so it might be a couple days before I can find stuff.

As for portability of RMA, the Freecycle group out of Missoula built a 6" system that they then carried on bicycles across town... It can be done. (Youtube Link)

Bob Rowlands 06-18-2015 08:02 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Yeah Rod thanks for the info.

MT Rod 06-19-2015 12:43 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Haha, it is great to see those guys are still getting into mischief.

I worked at the corner of downtown and downtown in Missoula for 18 years. I knew Geof back then, and Paul took classes with my ex-wife at the University of Montana years ago. I knew them both from potlucks and such. I still recognize their faces, but for some reason they look older... but I have lived in China for 9 years now.

I hope to get back there this summer for a few days, I have a yurt or 2 to raise.

I know mass heaters work, I lived in an old apartment building in Germany (it had been Luftwaffe pilot's barracks in WWII) in the 1970's that would freeze your butt off if you didn't build a really hot fire about every 3 days and burn it all day.

After the walls warmed up they would stay that way for a day or so and then it started cooling off pretty quickly. There were 3 rooms and a kitchen, so you had to have a fire going hot in one of them all the time, the fire, the warm walls and the door cracked open heated the rest of the rooms in the house up to "sweater weather". Basically the whole building was a mass heater.

I would stop while riding my bike home and help myself to a bag of coal off an unused pile that was on the back of the kaserne where I worked. I picked up a paper grocery sack 3/4th full and stuck it in the rack on the back of my bike six days a week. There was a small white enamel coal/wood burner cook-stove in the kitchen. It would not keep the place warm alone, but it helped a lot.

In two rooms the heater was a big cabinet sized, vented kerosene stove. Oil was expensive then, probably still is, even though the cost has come down per barrel.

In those days I wasn't thinking about DTU's. ;)

Rod
rod::email::yurtlocker.com

hierony 07-12-2015 01:18 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Poked around some, found some numbers.

Wood: 8600 btu/lb (ideal, no moisture & oxygen burn/lab)
Typical 6200 btu/lb (20% moisture, semi-realistic)
Yak 5800- 7600 btu/lb
Goat/Sheep 5200 btu/lb
Kiang: 6900 btu/lb
Cow manure 8600 btu/lb ideal
5500 btu/lb practical (15% ash, 25% moisture)

Metric
Wood, typ 14.4 MJ/kg
Yak 13-17 MJ/kg
Goat/Sheep 12 MJ/kg
Kiang 16 MJ/kg
Cow manure 13 MJ/kg practical

Sources: yak/sheep/goat/kiang; wood; cow

Note: These are energy density numbers, expressed in energy/weight. Normally wood is sold by volume, making volume density (weight/volume) important--this avoids inconsistencies due to moisture weight but is probably just due to tradition & ease of measuring volume rather than weight of a cord.

Corn stover and wheat straw are both pretty good fuel sources, too, when dry (8200 btu/lb or so). Crappy when wet, however (4100 btu/lb). Wood chips are somewhere around the 4000 btu/lb, if I recall from an epa study pdf I lost...

Alas, I was not able to find numbers for dog manure energy density. Given that dogs are somewhat omnivorous like humans and have historically been feed with human food/scraps, a crude estimate would put the energy density of their poop as similar to humans, which is seemingly 9900 btu/lb (23 MJ/kg) completely dry (source). Normal water content is 20-70%. But finding enough dog/human excrement to burn daily might be a bit of a chore/require lots of dogs & humans. In which case, you're probably better off just using their body heat directly...

Bob Rowlands 07-14-2015 07:29 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
That made my morning. :D

MT Rod 07-14-2015 10:35 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I am not sure what a Kiang is... but that is some noteworthy research, good shit as some would say.

I am also pondering how many cords of dog poop I would burn in a Montana winter, It might work if you had some sled dog teams too...

Luckily I don't have any dog teams, the neighbors always hate you for the noise. That and the fact that I am living approximately at the Tropic of Cancer, (no relation to the Miller book) in China for a little longer.

Next year it is yurts in Ecuador.

Rod
rod::email::yurtlocker.com
Home Page.

wrdanner 09-21-2015 03:50 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hierony (Post 5409)
What are you making your platform out of? Are you building or buying your yurt? How do you plan to insulate it?

Everything is open for consideration at this point. The yurt will be on the coast of North Carolina so I'm trying to figure out how to deal with the humidity and hurricanes. I'm considering building the yurt myself. Having no air underneath the yurt would be the most sound way to approach the hurricane issue but that also makes it more difficult should we require HVAC to deal with the hot summers. There will be some shade where we're building but I just don't know how uncomfortable the yurt will get without it. There will be a garage attached to the yurt and the kitchen/bathroom are in there. The thought was to have HVAC for the kitchen/bathroom and then if we found it was necessary, run ducting under the yurt. This requires the yurt to be built off the ground though.

The bedroom will be in the yurt so it needs to be fairly comfortable in a region where the overnight lows can stay in the low 70's with high humidity. It's possible we could go with a window unit in a glass window in the bedroom but it's all speculation at the moment. I've been trying to learn as much as I can to figure out what's the best way to approach it.

If the yurt was built on the ground, a rocket mass heater would give the yurt thermal mass. We would actually consider putting two of them in, on each side. I've looked at them on permies.com and the idea seems really cool, plus you get a seat or something else out of the surface if you do it right. This would alleviate my concern of constantly having to keep a fire running full tilt, unless we chose to add traditional insulation to the walls and then cover the studding to help with heat loss. The added mass will also help with hurricanes. In a hurricane, I'm less concerned with the yurt coming apart than the whole structure trying to blow away. I have no experience with this other than people's reports of them holding up well because the shape of the yurt causes the wind to push it down into the ground. I think the biggest issue here would be a lateral, sheering movement. Obviously the yurt would have to be well anchored no matter what we do but adding mass would help. Of course all that mass radiating heat in the winter also means mass that has to be cooled in the summer, unless the rocket mass heater was portable. I've seen some cool designs for portable ones as well.

Marshall Eppley 09-21-2015 05:09 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Dig your duct in before you build the yurt.nothing like natural insulation. They bury duct work in slabs all the time.

wrdanner 09-21-2015 08:18 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Marshall Eppley (Post 5850)
Dig your duct in before you build the yurt.nothing like natural insulation. They bury duct work in slabs all the time.

If we buried the duct work in the ground (sand) would we still want insulated duct work or would PVC do the trick with the ground insulating it? We'd transition to some type of insulated pipe if it needed to run above ground for any length.

Bob Rowlands 09-21-2015 10:04 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I hate to say it but a yurt is very unlikely to survive a full on hurricane regardless of what foundation it is anchored to. This is jmo. I have been in mine -very solidly anchored- in 60 mph+ wind, and was edgy. I seriously doubt it could withstand continuous 100 mph wind and driving rain. FWIW my first yurt was destroyed in a blizzard, however it wasn't anchored to the ground.

I don't mean to deter you from building one, but I'd seek heavier shelter in full on hurricane. A yurt is still a tent regardless. Good luck.

wrdanner 09-21-2015 10:21 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Bob Rowlands (Post 5855)
I hate to say it but a yurt is very unlikely to survive a full on hurricane regardless of what foundation it is anchored to. This is jmo. I have been in mine -very solidly anchored- in 60 mph+ wind, and was edgy. I seriously doubt it could withstand continuous 100 mph wind and driving rain. FWIW my first yurt was destroyed in a blizzard, however it wasn't anchored to the ground.

I don't understand how yurt companies can claim to sell yurts that withstand 100 mph winds then when buying all the snow and wind options. We would be doing the whole nine. 2x6 roof joists, wall supports for every roof joist, every joint connect via metal brackets, block spacers between all roof joists, etc. With all that reinforcement I personally think the skeleton of a yurt is stronger than a house provided the yurt is well anchored to the ground, and the fact that it's leaky means it's unlikely it will explode or implode due to pressure differences.

It would take a direct hit from a cat 2 hurricane to see 100 mph winds. It's unlikely the yurt will house anything more than the bedroom and dining/living area. The kitchen and bathroom will be in the adjoining garage. I'm sure well vacate the area the first go 'round and see how the yurt does.

I suppose we could move the furniture into the adjoining shed (which will be constructed to residential standards) and uncover the yurt. I know that would survive.

kcoad 11-08-2015 06:21 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
1 Attachment(s)
Just came upon this post and figured I should post our experience with building a Thermal Mass Heater in a 30' yurt purchased from Pacific Yurts in Oregon. We built our TMH just about 2 months ago. The area we live in, Southern BC, Canada, gets fairly cold in the winter… potentially -18 degrees C. We love our TMH, as we love the look and that you can cuddle up to it… our cats love it too.

…. however…. the hottest it seems we are able to get it is 19 degrees C. The heat is nice and stable once it does heat up, but it takes a looong time to get there, and the mornings are not so comfortable. We are a little concerned, at this point, that it may not be a terribly comfortable winter. At present the outside temps are around -1 degree C, and already we walk around w/ toques and housecoats on for 2 or three hours. Lets just say it doesn't inspire one to get cracking with their day.

Eventually we plan to wall our yurt in, and I'm sure the TMH will be wonderful once we do that. Meanwhile, we may have to get some supplemental heat source. Perhaps a diesel heater? (we are on limited solar).

Re the foundation, we are on a raised platform and we did beef up the foundation under the area the TMH was to go.

Bob Rowlands 11-09-2015 10:01 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Thanks for the report.

hierony 11-09-2015 10:33 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Kcoad:

Awesome heater--I like how you made it the steps to your loft. Did you find it difficult to make?

30' is a lot of space to heat. How often do you fire it? Any idea how much wood you use each time?

Prepper420 11-10-2015 01:33 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I'm interested too since I plan on using a rocket stove with radient floor heating much like this design.http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/11...7087891573.jpg

Bob Rowlands 11-10-2015 09:18 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I really like the hands on, frugal approach to doing things in general. That photo has do it yourself alternative written all over it. Very nice start whoever built it.

paul wheaton 10-29-2016 07:12 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Hi,

I'm Paul Wheaton. I was linked to earlier and then talked about .... apparently I took a class a looong time ago with somebody's wife! :)


And, as it turns out, I might make the top ten list of rocket mass heater experts. I have about 20 youtube videos, a big article and 8 DVDs on the topic.

Ernie and Erica have a new book out on the topic called "The Rocket Mass Heater Builder's Guide." Excellent book. My name is peppered through it. The flagship demo build is at my place.

Now .... to the roots of my post ....

Yes! Ooodles of people have put these in yurts! And, if your yurt is build on a platform, as most of them are, then you will need to shore up the floor before building the rocket mass heater. Although I do have a great thread about a yurt build where the rocket mass heater was actually UNDER the yurt. Interesting design. So the floor ended up being heated. I would post a link, but the rules of this forum says that would be naughty.

But .... here is the most important thing I wanna share right now ... we put one in a tipi. Uninsulated. Bam!

The thing is that a rocket mass heater is super duper efficient for a lot of reasons, but a big part of that is that it does all sorts of stuff in a very different way. And we wanted to PROVE that by putting a rocket mass heater in an obviously uninsulated structure.

And we have a couple living in the tipi in montana. And one night it gets down to 26 below. The couple gets up in the morning ... and y'all need to note that the fire has been out for eight hours ... they don't know how bitter cold it is outside. They take off their night clothes and put on their day clothes and .... right there, that's the most important part. Apparently, when they changed they felt like the temperature in the tipi was a little over 50.

---

Another thing that was mentioned was youtube videos. There are hundreds. Maybe thousands. I think I put up the first. And I now have about 20 up there. But there are lots of problems - people are building freakshows of flaming death and calling them rocket mass heaters. So it is really tough to figure out what is the best path.

---

Most rocket mass heaters are built in a couple of days. Really fancy ones can take a week or more. And the new pebble style stuff is super fast.


I hope this helps!

rangeroad 11-08-2016 06:09 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Wow is there a 'bowing down' emoticon? Thank you for your post, Paul Wheaton! Permies.com is the best!!! Folks, Mr. Wheaton is THE guru for your RMH build and install.

Jafo 11-08-2016 08:02 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
That's great. They do take up a lot of space though yeah? Paul, go ahead and post any relevant links you have about these heaters. I am okaying it.

paul wheaton 11-08-2016 02:56 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
Neat! I'm famous-ish!

I gotta be clear: I am not "THE" authority. I think that if you squink your left eye while bouncing on your right leg in bad light, I might make the top 10 list.

However, I think I did make the first youtube video about rocket mass heaters. And the first public/free article. And I have a big gob of dvds and I host the annual innovators event.

Here is my youtube channel with about 20 rocket mass heater dvds:

https://www.youtube.com/c/paulwheaton

Here is my article:

rocket stove mass heater

Here is my new DVD set:

Better Wood Heat: DIY Rocket Mass Heater Videos

Here is a thread about a rocket mass heater in a yurt:

https://permies.com/t/40/5937/rocket...heater-finally

(note that they set it up so the fire is outside and the mass is under the floor. Note also that they elected to replace the barrel with a fabricated bell)

And here is our famous experiment with a rocket mass heater in a tipi:

https://permies.com/t/29327/RMH-Tipi

All of these are loaded with pictures, so you get a feel for how much space they take.

We have a forum dedicated to answering questions about rocket mass heaters:

https://permies.com/f/260/rocket-mass-heaters

I think you will see that that forum is very active.

Here is more information on "The Rocket Mass Heater Builder's Guide":

https://permies.com/t/57365/Rocket-M...-Builder-Guide

hierony 11-10-2016 05:03 PM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
One of the reasons I chose a masonry heater instead of an RMH was the footprint (and relative portability). Now, I didn't quite have the imagination for making the entire yurt platform part of the thermal mass--I like it! Maybe when I have a more permanent place, I'll setup that way.

Bob Rowlands 11-12-2016 11:41 AM

Re: Rocket Mass Heater in a yurt
 
I lived in Farrand hall on the CU Boulder campus back in 72-72. It was a very old building even back then. Steam boiler radiator in every dorm room. Lemme tell yuh that sucker was niiice and warm. Those old radiators are cast iron. They weigh a couple hundred pounds-each- and of course that is why they deliver nice even warmth. I worked on an old house a few years ago that had all the cast radiators pulled to have lead paint removed. It took a crew to do it. Mass really is key to a superb heating system.


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